Archive for the 'netizens' Category

Nailhouse torn down!

April 3, 2007

According to Chinese news outlets the Nailhouse was torn down after the owners Mrs. Wuping and her husband reached an agreement with the developer.   See more from Danwei 

Interview with China’s most incredible holdout

March 22, 2007

This is a follow up on my previous posts with regards to “China’s most incredible holdout”, where a housing dispute led to the developer digging a moat around someone’s house who refused to move. This post is the translation of an interview with the owner of this “nailhouse” on an island, 40 year old Mrs. Wuping.

According to the interview, all Mrs. Wuping wanted was a space of comparable footage in the new building but the developer just wanted to give her a small sum of money. The local press was also forbidden to report on the story and the developer worked with the local government and courts to coerce Mrs. Wuping.

In this long interview you get an inside look into the local politics of relocation and the kind of difficulties people face if they chose to fight the developer.

You can also watch a CCTV legal society TV program which includes interviews with the developer and Mrs. Wuping and a number of Chongqing residents. Link to video HERE.

Translated from Chinese, original can be found here.
Another interview from a Beijing newpaper 新京报 here

Mrs. WupingOn March 21st China.net reported that “China’s Most Incredible Holdout” which caused a huge stir on the Internet will soon disappear. Yesterday Chongqing Jiulong Hill District court held a hearing and ruled that the owner of the property (the holdout) has until the 22nd to tear down the building. Chongqing Court decides “Histories most incredible holdout” must relocate in three days became one of today’s hot topics on web forums throughout china. The following is the transcript of a telephone interview with the household’s owner, Mrs. Wuping

Facing the notification: I don’t have the power to appeal

Host: We saw the Chongqing courts decision on the Internet, can you explain to us in simple terms what the situation is?

Wuping: Among the residents moving, I am the largest private property owner, furthermore you can basically say I am the only one who has complete papers, such as a property rights land right certificates, they both clearly indicated that it is a building zoned for business. At that time I had just finished renovations, and they (the developer) said they had to tear everything down and people had to be relocated, as a result this was really damaging for us. According to my property right certificate, I am clearly in ownership of 219 square meters, so for this use it should be returned to me.

Read the rest of this entry »

China’s Most Incredible Holdout

March 8, 2007

The following is a news article translated from Southern Metropolis Daily. This is about a building site in Chongqing that has brought about suspicion on the web forums in China.

钉子户 = literally means “a slug house” but it means someone who refuses to move out from their house. I have translated it as a “holdout,” there might be a better translation but its all I could think of.

The original can be found here.

More pictures here

打更匠:这是售楼部吧
This must be the sales office building

mertin:可能是文物⋯⋯
It might be some sort of historical relic

yanlimm:这要练习攀岩啊?
Maybe people are practicing rock climbing here?

硬是:不知道这楼将来怎么盖,很考验施工技术啊
How are they going to build this building? This is a true test of construction technology

普通朋友:人家把周围挖了是要建护城河的
They excavated the surroundings to build a moat!

At the beginning of this month, a post titled “history’s most incredible holdout” started circulating on a famous BBS, the content of the post is a picture of a 10 meter deep pit dug around a solitary small two story building, just like a small boat in the middle of the ocean.

Netizens were all shook, either crazily praising “the most incredible holdout” or puzzled as to how anyone would live in there, and how would the building be developed. With regards to the source of the picture, the opinions of the netizens vary. Some people mistook this for last year’s “Most incredible holdout of Shanghai.” Both buildings do have resemblance. Some people also said this is from Chongqing, as they had passed through there in the past few days.

This reporter thus initiated investigation and interview

The isolated island on the side of the light rail

This reporter discovered, the picture first appeared on the internet on the 26th of February. At that time it was clearly written as: “Chongqing City JiuLong Hill District Yangjiaping Pedestrian Street. Author stood on Yangjiaping light rail station and took this picture.” Its possible because of the relative obscurity of the original BBS, and its wide circulation on the web that the original explanation was lost.

Local residents of Chongqing explained that this building is quite famous, alot of people in Chongqing have seen it. If you ride the light rail and pass through Yangjiaping station you are able to see a peculiar landscape: in the middle of a construction site stands a solitary small two story building, the surrounding soil has all been excavated, just like it was built on an isolated island. A chongqing resident then took a picture and named it “China’s most incredible holdout.”

Contractor Temporary Residence? Household resisting eminent domain?

One netizen said this wasn’t a holdout at all, it was actually the contractor’s temporary residence, there were also other netizens who supported this position.

After verification, this was determined as Chongqing city’s “Broadway” real estate construction site currently being put up in the residential quarter. A saleswoman who works for Weilian Real Estate Sales Company stated that the “Broadway” project is already in its second stage, the first stage has already completely been sold, and the small building is a holdout unwilling to relocate. The second phase is currently excavating the foundation; the circumstances are just like what you can see in the picture. For more information I was told to inquire with the developer, but I was unable to get through to their telephone.

Nobody is living in there now.

One netizen revealed, this house used to belong to the Yangjiaping Housing Management Office, according to theory, it’s a state-owned house, but for historical reasons it was rented out to a private leaser. The leaser wanted 200,000,000RMB from the developer or else he wouldn’t move. His family had some background and connections, so the developer didn’t dare take action. As a result this “wonder” was created.

Nevertheless, this netizen’s statement has not been verified. During an interview, Yangjiaping Housing Management Office’s Vice-Secretary Liu Ling indicated the situation was unclear. Furthermore, a worker on duty stated this building is a holdout who has stayed behind.

What the netizens are most interested in is if anyone is living in this building. If there is someone, how do they get in and out? An editor of the Chongqing Morning Report who everyday on his way to work passes through the area said that the building is deserted, there’s no furniture or he hasn’t seen anyone inside, and dug out like this its impossible for anyone to get in.

Netbar’s restricted in China for 2007

March 6, 2007

As of 2007 no more new permits will be given out for web bars, and any that were under construction must be completed within the next 6 months. Furthermore, the new regulations emphasize the restriction of 18 and under in Internet bars.

In my experience these laws have had difficulty being implemented. While Beijing is regulated and you need to use a I.D to surf the Internet, when I was in Harbin nothing of the sort was required. In Harbin web bars I regularly saw people looking at porn, kids clearly under 18 using the Internet, and operating hours that were well past city regulations.

Article HERE (Chinese)

War on Corruption

February 23, 2007

Pick up any Chinese newspaper, magazine or read a blog online and you’ll probably heard about some corrupt official in some province, city or SOE that has run off with prostitutes and dirty loans and settled down in Canada. Hu, in what some have called simply a house cleaning of his adversaries, has been waging a “war on corruption.” In the latest news, China is looking to establish a corruption prevention center. Forget what the experts say, what do Chinese netizens have to say.

Comments are in Chinese from 凯迪社区

鬼才相信自己领导自己能反自己的腐败
“Only ghosts believe their own leaders can prevent their own corruption”

又多了一个潜在的腐败单位
“another potentially corrupt unit”

老百姓惨了,又要一个分享腐败成果的部门。
“This is miserable for the people, another department to share the profits of corruption.”

世界上只有一种真正的监督,那就是新闻自由下的监督
“there is only one real kind of supervision in the world, thats supervision under a free press”

如果国家预防腐败局的官员贪腐字怎么办?可以再建立一个预防国家预防腐败局腐败厅啊!嘿嘿,
“What happens if the officials in the State Corruption Prevention Department are corrupt? You can establish a State Corruption Prevention Department Corruption Office, hehe.”

就一个党派 没有竞争的 很难发展好啊
“just one political party without competition, its hard to develop well.”

中国筹建拥有强大权力的“国家预防腐败局集团公司”。
China is preparing to build a strong and powerful “State Corruption Prevention Department Conglomerate & Co. Ltd.”

可以预见,国家预防腐败局将成为今后油水最多的衙门。”it’s foreseeable, the State Corruption Prevention Department will become the most profitable government office”